1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation. Horatio Sharpe, Robert Lloyd, Royal Governor of Maryland, Speaker of the Colonial Maryland Assembly.
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation
1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation

1768 Newspaper MARYLAND REACTS to MASSACHUSETTS Taxation Without Representation

Boston, Massachusetts: The Boston Chronicle, 1768. Very Good. Item #13420

A Spectacular piece of Maryland pre-Revolutionary War history, this July 18, 1768 issue of the Boston Chronicle features two important letters regarding the influential Massachusetts Circular Letter of February, 1768, authored by Sons of Liberty Samuel Adams and James Otis, protesting the infamous Townshend Acts.

The Acts and the resulting protests across the colonies brought heightened tensions between America and the British Crown and were key catalysts in driving the colonies toward the American Revolution.

The first letter is a letter from Maryland Royal Governor Horatio Sharpe to his Colonial Assembly asking the Assembly to not enflame the wave of dissention sweeping the colonies and ignore the Circular Letter.

King George III "considers such measures to be of a most dangerous and factious tendency, calculated to inflame the minds of his good subjects in the colonies...to excite and encourage an open opposition to and denial of the authority of parliament, and to subvert the true principles of the constitution."

Sharpe goes on to request the Assembly to take "no notice of such letter, which will be treating it with the contempt it deserves."

The letter features Sharpe's signature in block type at its conclusion.

The second letter is the response of the Maryland Assembly, signed in block type by Speaker Robert Lloyd, refusing to comply with the Royal Governor's request.

"We can not but view this as an attempt in some of his Majesty's ministers to suppress all communication of sentiments between the colonies, and to prevent the united supplications of America from reaching the royal ear...

"We have the warmest and most affectionate attachments to our most gracious sovereign, and shall ever pay the readiest and most respectful regard to the just and constitutional power of the British parliament; but we shall not be intimidated by a few founding expressions from doing what we think is right."

Opposition to the Townshend Acts led to Britain sending troops to occupy the city of Boston, which directly led to the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party and later the shots fired at Lexington and Concord in 1775.

This original 1768 newspaper is complete in eight pages and is in Very Good condition. Both lengthy letters appear on an inside page. Disbound.

An important and very desirable piece of Maryland Revolutionary-era history.

Price: $450.00