1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula. Hartmann Schedel.
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula
1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula

1493 Single Illustrated Leaf from the MEDIEVAL NUREMBERG CHRONICLE Incunabula

Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 1493. 1st Edition. Very Good. Item #900125

an original 1493 single leaf, two pages, illustrated on each side, from the Latin Nuremberg Chronicle, Liber Chronicarum, arguably the 2nd most important printed book of the Incunabula era, the 15th Century.

This leaf, Plate XX, is of Ninive - (Nineveh) depticting the fortified medieval city. The entrance to the city has a statue of a king holding a scepter in his right hand, and on the verso an intricately illustrated family tree, beginning with Nehor and Melcha.

The Chronicle was first published in Latin on July 12, 1493 in the city of Nuremberg. This was quickly followed by a German translation on December 23, 1493. An estimated 1400 to 1500 Latin and 700 to 1000 German copies were published. A document from 1509 records that 539 Latin versions and 60 German versions had not been sold. Approximately 400 Latin and 300 German copies survived into the twenty-first century. They are scattered around the world in museums and collections. The larger illustrations were also sold separately as prints, often hand-colored in watercolor. Many copies of the book are colored, with varying degrees of skill; there were specialist shops for this. The coloring on some examples have been added much later, and some copies have been broken up for sale as decorative prints.

The publisher and printer was Anton Koberger, the godfather of Albrecht Dürer, who in the year of Dürer's birth in 1471 ceased goldsmithing to become a printer and publisher. He quickly became the most successful publisher in Germany, eventually owning 24 printing presses and having many offices in Germany and abroad, from Lyon to Buda.

Very Good condition, with mild rubbing and sporadic foxing. There is a one-inch closed separation along the fore-edge, not affecting any image or text.



This leaf measures approximately 12" X 17" and is perfect for framing and display!

Price: $350.00